Easter Greetings from The Anarchy Egg

The 2012 Anarchy Egg of Somerville, © The Middle Ground, 2012.

 

On the eve of Easter each year, my family partakes in the pagan ritual known as egg coloring. My mother hard boils about three or four dozen eggs for our extremely loud and incredibly close family. Both children and adults draw on said eggs with crayons. We fight to the death over the “magic crayon,” the clear crayon that reveals secret truths upon dyeing. We fight to the death over desired colors of dye.

For the most part, we abide by standard egg coloring decorum and practice, save one minor familial invention – THE ANARCHY EGG.

Guts of The Anarchy Egg, displayed in an old creamer, © The Middle Ground, 2012.

 

I’m not sure who first thought of The Anarchy Egg or when it started, but it was definitely prior to the birth of the glorious youngest child (that would be me). As legend has it, it is but an ordinary egg born from the depths of fowl despair, doomed to fall at the hands of negligent children, and destined to rise from its outer shell of indifference, into a beast of beautiful chaos. Quite simply, it is the egg that some kid drops or breaks during the decorating process. Once we have dyed all of the perfect eggs, we combine all of the dyes into a vat, sometimes sprinkling a little of this or that to add to the holy discord. Then we place the unholy beast into a cup or vessel and stab it Somerville-style with martini swords, straws, or whatever bizarre things we can find. I’m not sure why we do this or what it says about my family, but I think we can all agree that The Anarchy Egg is an awesome Somerville invention.

Please note The Anarchy Egg is meant for worship, conversation, and anarchy. It is not meant for consumption.

Old cell phone photo of the 2008 Anarchy Egg, © The Middle Ground, 2012.

 

© The Middle Ground, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited.

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